Theodore Stuart Brodie

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Lieutenant-Commander Theodore Stuart Brodie (19 January, 1884 – 17 April, 1915) was a submarine officer in the Royal Navy who was killed at the Dardanelles in 1915. He could play the violin.

Life & Career

Theodore Brodie was the son of the iron founder George Gordon Brodie of Birmingham. He entered the Royal Navy with the September 1898 intake term of Britannia, scoring 2610 marks on his entrance examination to narrowly beat his twin brother, Charles Gordon Brodie, being sixth of sixty-six candidates accepted for that term.[1] Both would go on to become submariners.

Theodore Brodie gained eight months' time on passing out of Britannia. He served in Mars in the Channel and then Royal Arthur on the Australian Station. In 1904 and through 1905, he served in a variety of destroyers, including Blackwater, Gipsy, Blackwater, Sylvia, Ostrich and Kennet, being promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on 19 January, 1905.[2]

From 15 August, 1905 Brodie commenced a series of appointments to battleships, including Magnificent, Barfleur, Prince George and Hindustan.

Brodie left Hindustan when he was appointed to Mercury for instruction in submarines on 13 January, 1908. Later that year, he started serving in submarines she was tending to. On 15 January, 1910, he was appointed in command of C 36. On 15 December, 1910 Brodie was appointed in command of C 33. Brodie was appointed to the submarine D 8 on 8 November, 1911, to assume command upon her commissioning. He suffered a bout of influenza at Chtham Hospital between 26 February and 6 March, 1912.[3]

Brodie was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander on 19 January, 1913.[4]

Brodie was appointed to the submarine E 15 on 2 September, 1914, to assume command upon her commissioning. He would prove to be her only-ever commander, as he died in the Sea of Marmora aboard E 15 on 17 April, 1915 with five of his crew. Initially reported by telegram from Mudros as having been taken prisoner, his death was finally confirmed by the U.S. Ambassador at Constantinople on 12 May, 1915.[5][6]

See Also

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
?
Captain of H.M.S. C 36
15 Jan, 1910[7][8] – 15 Dec, 1910[9]
Succeeded by
Godfrey Herbert
Preceded by
Godfrey Herbert
Captain of H.M.S. C 33
15 Dec, 1910 – 8 Nov, 1911[10]
Succeeded by
Gerald E. B. Carter
Preceded by
New Command
Captain of H.M.S. D 8
8 Nov, 1911[11] – 15 Oct, 1912[12]
Succeeded by
William J. Foster
Preceded by
New Command
Captain of H.M.S. E 15
2 Sep, 1914[13] – 17 Apr, 1915[14]
Succeeded by
Vessel Lost

Footnotes

  1. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Aug 10, 1898; pg. 6; Issue 35591.
  2. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  3. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  4. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  5. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  6. Kindell. Royal Navy Roll of Honour Part 2. p. 82.
  7. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  8. The Navy List. (April, 1910). p. 344.
  9. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  10. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  11. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  12. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  13. Brodie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/3. f. ?.
  14. Hepper. British Warship Losses in the Ironclad Era: 1860-1919. p. 35.