Lawrence Leopold Dundas

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Captain Lawrence Leopold Dundas, C.M.G., (29 April, 1874 – ) was an officer in the Royal Navy.

Life & Career

Dundas was given seven months' additional seniority on passing out of Britannia in July, 1889. In mid-September, he was appointed to Northumberland of the Channel Squadron.

Dundas was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on 31 December, 1895.[1]

Dundas was appointed in command of the destroyer Lightning on 6 January, 1900.[2]

He was promoted to the rank of Commander on 31 December, 1907.[3]

In July 1910 he was appointed to the battleship Lord Nelson. He left her in mid-1913 and was presently appointed in command of the corvette Diamond on 8 September, 1913. He saw her through a brief period of trials and on 30 September took her into active service, receiving a satisfactory inspection on 3 October.[4]

Dundas was promoted to the rank of Captain on 30 June, 1916.[5]

Dundas was appointed in command of the armed merchant cruiser Motagua on 27 July, 1916. She was mined on 16 March, 1917 and Dundas was praised for his successful efforts to save the ship. Motagua was docked at Birkenhead from 11 April to 20 June, 1917 for repairs and, seemingly, installation of paravane equipment. Dundas continued to serve in command of the armed merchant cruiser until on 10 May, 1918.[6][7]

At 8:10am on 19 March 1918 at Lat 49.50, Long -8.47 while escorting a convoy out of Dakar, Motagua collided with the American destroyer U.S.S. Manley. The destroyer's depth charges detonated on her stern, heavily damaging Motagua and setting Manley afire. Twenty-eight of Dundas's crew were killed and many wounded (one of whom would later die), while Manley suffered thirty-four deaths. The Admiralty appreciated Dundas's conduct in the event, successfully bringing his ship into Devonport by 3:15pm on 20 March.[8][9]

On 6 April, 1918, Dundas was gazetted for a mention in despatches for his service with the Ninth Cruiser Squadron during 1917. His appointment in the badly damaged Motagua ended in May, 1918 and he was appointed for duty with the Trade Division on 10 May, working with the M.M.A.C.[10]. Dundas was awarded a C.M.G. for his convoy and escort work, gazetted 3 June, 1918 and invested 26 September. He would briefly serve as president of the M.M.A.C. from 26 September 1918 to 28 October, 1918, when Rear-Admiral Palmer was ill with sciatica.[11]

Post-War

On 1 March, 1919, Dundas was appointed in command of the light cruiser Phaeton.[12] On 23 June, he asked to be appointed second-in-command of Second Light Cruiser Squadron, but this was refused. In 1920, he would be mentioned in despatches for his service in command of Phaeton at Libau.[13]

Dundas was placed on the Retired List on 24 November, 1922. He died in mid 1939 with no notations indicating training for or inquiries regarding his possible service in the coming war. His step-son was informed that his widow would retain his C.M.G. decoration.

See Also

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
Loftus C. O. Mansergh
Captain of H.M.S. Lightning
6 Jan, 1900[14] – 24 Apr, 1900[15]
Succeeded by
Rowland H. Bather
Preceded by
New Command
Captain of H.M.S. Kestrel
24 Apr, 1900[16] – 11 Jan, 1901[17]
Succeeded by
Theobald W. B. Kennedy
Preceded by
Edward G. Lowther-Crofton
Captain of H.M.S. Diamond
8 Sep, 1913[18][19] – 27 Jul, 1916[20]
Succeeded by
The Hon. Lionel J. O. Lambart
Preceded by
John A. Webster
Captain of H.M.S. Motagua
27 Jul, 1916[21][22] – 10 May, 1918[23]
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
John E. Cameron
Captain of H.M.S. Phaeton
1 Mar, 1919[24][25] – 20 Feb, 1921[26]
Succeeded by
Guy P. Bowles
Preceded by
Arthur M. Stancomb
Captain of H.M.S. Blake
1 Mar, 1921[27]c. late 1921[Inference]
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
Frank Powell
Captain of H.M.S. Blenheim
c. late 1921[Inference] – 1 Nov, 1922[28]
Succeeded by
Thomas J. S. Lyne

Footnotes

  1. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  2. "Naval & Military Intelligence" (Official Appointments and Notices). The Times. Tuesday, 2 January, 1900. Issue 36028, col E, p. 7.
  3. The Navy List. (April, 1914). p. 100.
  4. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  5. The Navy List. (June, 1919). p. 57.
  6. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  7. Ship's Log.
  8. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  9. Ship's Log.
  10. I don't know what this is, probably a committee.
  11. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  12. The Navy List. (January, 1920). p. 828.
  13. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  14. "Naval & Military Intelligence". The Times. Tuesday, 2 January, 1900. Issue 36028, col E, p. 7.
  15. The Navy List. (January, 1901). p. 273.
  16. The Navy List. (January, 1901). p. 273.
  17. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  18. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  19. The Navy List. (October, 1915). p. 393j.
  20. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  21. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  22. The Navy List. (August, 1917). p. 401s.
  23. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  24. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  25. The Navy List. (February, 1920). p. 829.
  26. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  27. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.
  28. Dundas Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/420. f. 467.