Difference between revisions of "Gun Deflection"

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Sight Deflection or "Gun Deflection" (or even "Scale" in American parlance) is the angular difference between a gun's bearing and the line of sight to the target intended to place the shell on target after factors that cause lateral deviation of shell or target during [[Time-of-flight|time-of-flight]] have played their role.  In riflery, this is often termed "Kentucky windage,", but in naval gunnery it takes on an even larger dimension.
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'''Sight Deflection''' or '''Gun Deflection''' (or '''Scale''' in American parlance) is the angular difference between a gun's orientation in bearing and the line of sight to the target.  This offset is intended to place the shell on target after factors that cause lateral deviation of shell or target during [[Time-of-flight|time-of-flight]] have played their role.   
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In riflery, this is often termed "Kentucky windage,", but in naval gunnery it takes on an even larger dimension owing to greater times-of-flight, speeds of firing vessel and target, ballistic drift and even [[Coriolis Effect]].
  
 
[[Category:Fire Control]]
 
[[Category:Fire Control]]

Revision as of 21:09, 2 August 2009

Sight Deflection or Gun Deflection (or Scale in American parlance) is the angular difference between a gun's orientation in bearing and the line of sight to the target. This offset is intended to place the shell on target after factors that cause lateral deviation of shell or target during time-of-flight have played their role.

In riflery, this is often termed "Kentucky windage,", but in naval gunnery it takes on an even larger dimension owing to greater times-of-flight, speeds of firing vessel and target, ballistic drift and even Coriolis Effect.