Thomas Henry Martyn Jerram

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Admiral SIR Thomas Henry Martyn Jerram, G.C.M.G., K.C.B., Royal Navy (6 September, 1858 – 19 March, 1933) was an officer of the Royal Navy.

Life & Career

Jerram was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant with seniority of 1 January, 1881.[1]

In 1884, Jerram was placed in command of the new first-class torpedo boat Childers and tasked with delivering her to the Victorian Government in Melbourne. The journey was to prove epic and demanding on the crew, as the small torpedo boat could only manage the heavy seas by shaking and wetting them continually. On arrival at Aden along the way, Jerram recorded, "I and the two other officers were unable to walk or even to wear socks for nearly three weeks, as we had been knocking about without boots, and were covered with blisters from the knees downwards. These were cut open and painted with white lead at Aden; a severe but effective remedy. The fact of being wet through day and night, and the want of sleep from anxiety and the excessive motion, rather pulled me down." The ordeal lasted four months and twenty days.[2]

Jerram was promoted to the rank of Commander on 1 January, 1894.[3]

Jerram was promoted to the rank of Captain on 1 January, 1899.[4]

From March 1902 to September 1903, he was captain of the battleship Albion.

In April of 1904, Jerram was appointed to command Russell, remaining in command until the end of December of the next year.

Flag Rank

Jerram (left) and Rear-Admiral Frederic E. E. Brock leaving Buckingham Palace after being invested with the insignia of Companions of the Order of the Bath on 10 October, 1912.
Photo: Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Jerram was promoted to the rank of Rear-Admiral on 30 June, 1908, vice Battenberg.[5]

He was appointed an Ordinary Member of the Third Class, or Companion, in the Civil Division of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (C.B.) on 21 September, 1912.[6] He was invested with the insignia of the order by the King in an investiture at Buckingham Palace on 10 October.[7]

Jerram and his wife left Liverpool in the liner Empress of Britain in late January, 1913, accompanied by his Flag Lieutenant, Hector Boyes, and his Secretary Charles Edward Lynes. They disembarked at Halifax and travelled by train to Vancouver and took another Canadian Pacific Liner to Hong Kong, stopping at Victoria, B.C., Yokohama and Shanghai. His appointment as Commander-in-Chief on the China Station, with the acting rank of Vice-Admiral, was dated 25 January, 1913.[8]

He was confirmed in the rank of Vice-Admiral on 4 June, 1913.[9]

On 1 January, 1914, he was appointed an Ordinary Member of the Second Class, or Knight Commander, in the Military Division of the Order of the Bath (K.C.B.).[10]

Jutland

After the battle, the battle cruisers visited Scapa Flow, and, according to Sir Shane Leslie, at a concert held on King George V "Beatty markedly cut Jerram dead … His bitterness was reserved for Admiral Jerram … Jerram remained in the line [of battle]. This Beatty never forgave."[11]

On 15 September he was appointed an Additional Member of the Second Class, or Knight Commander, in the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George (K.C.M.G.) for his services at Jutland, dated 31 May.[12]

Post-Grand Fleet

Jerram was promoted to the rank of Admiral on 10 April, 1917, vice Coke.[13]

Jerram was placed on the Retired List at his own request on 30 January, 1918.[14]

On the occasion of the King's birthday he was appointed an Additional Member of the First Class, or Knight Grand Cross, of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George (G.C.M.G.) on 3 June, 1919.[15]

See Also

Bibliography

  • "Admiral Sir Martyn Jerram" (Obituaries). The Times. Tuesday, 21 March, 1933. Issue 46398, col B, p. 16.

Papers

Images

  • 1920 Neville S Lytton portrait in the possession of the Imperial War Museum. Catalogue Number IWM ART 3141.

Service Records

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
New Command
Captain of H.M.V.S. Childers
1884[16]
Succeeded by
Michael Fitzgerald
Preceded by
Herbert W. S. Gibson
Captain of H.M.S. Curacoa
2 Jun, 1896[17]
Succeeded by
Herbert Lyon
Preceded by
William McC. F. Castle
Captain of H.M.S. Mersey
11 Jul, 1899[18] – 21 Aug, 1899[19]
Succeeded by
Conyers Lang
Preceded by
Cecil Burney
Captain of Training Ship H.M.S. Boscawen
1 Sep, 1899[20] – 13 Mar, 1902[21]
Succeeded by
Lionel G. Tufnell
Preceded by
William C. Pakenham
Captain of H.M.S. Albion
14 Mar, 1902[22] – 23 Dec, 1903[23]
Succeeded by
Sydney R. Fremantle
Preceded by
Francis R. Pelly
Captain of H.M.S. Russell
18 Apr, 1904[24][25] – Dec, 1905[Inference]
Succeeded by
Robert S. Lowry
Preceded by
Robert S. Lowry
Captain of Royal Naval Engineering College, Keyham
6 Dec, 1905[26]
Succeeded by
Lionel G. Tufnell
Preceded by
Sir George A. Callaghan
Second-in-Command, Mediterranean Station
9 Aug, 1910[27] – 31 Jul, 1912[28]
Succeeded by
Sir Cecil Burney
Preceded by
Sir Alfred L. Winsloe
Commander-in-Chief, China Station
25 Jan, 1913[29][30] – 28 Jul, 1915[31]
Succeeded by
Sir William L. Grant
Preceded by
Sir George J. S. Warrender, Bart.
Vice-Admiral Commanding, Second Battle Squadron
16 Dec, 1915[32][33] – 29 Nov, 1916[34]
Succeeded by
Sir John M. de Robeck

Footnotes

  1. The London Gazette: no. 24992. p. 74. 7 January, 1881.
  2. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1884. pp. xii-xiii.
  3. The London Gazette: no. 26471. p. 7581. 29 December, 1893.
  4. The London Gazette: no. 27040. p. 84. 6 January, 1899.
  5. The London Gazette: no. 28156. p. 4940. 7 July, 1908.
  6. The London Gazette: no. 28648. p. 7107. 27 September, 1912.
  7. "Court Circular" (Court and Social). The Times. Friday, 11 October, 1912. Issue 40027, col A, p. 9.
  8. "Naval and Military Intelligence" (Official Appointments and Notices). The Times. Saturday, 25 January, 1913. Issue 40118, col G, p. 5.
  9. The London Gazette: no. 28726. p. 3992. 6 June, 1913.
  10. Edinburgh Gazette: no. 12630. p. 7. 2 January, 1914.
  11. Leslie Papers. Churchill College, Cambridge. SLGF 12/1.
  12. The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 29751. p. 9071. 15 September, 1916.
  13. The London Gazette: no. 30017. p. 3496. 13 April, 1917.
  14. The London Gazette: no. 30522. p. 1945. 12 February, 1918.
  15. Edinburgh Gazette: no. 13459. p. 2063. 5 June, 1919.
  16. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1884. pp. xii-xiii.
  17. The Navy List. (October, 1898). p. 242.
  18. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/19. f. 407.
  19. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/19. f. 407.
  20. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.
  21. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/19. f. 407.
  22. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/19. f. 407.
  23. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/19. f. 407.
  24. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/87. f. 65.
  25. The Navy List. (November, 1905). p. 370.
  26. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.
  27. Squadrons and Senior Naval Officers in Existence on 11th November, 1918. Unnumbered Folio.
  28. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.
  29. Supplement to the Monthly Navy List. (December, 1914). p. 7.
  30. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.
  31. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.
  32. Squadrons and Senior Naval Officers in Existence on 11th November, 1918. f. 3.
  33. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.
  34. Jerram Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/38. f. 692.