Loftus Charles Ogilvy Mansergh

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Lieutenant Loftus Charles Ogilvy Mansergh (2 March, 1873 – 18 March, 1904) served in the Royal Navy. He has the tragic distinction of being the first Royal Navy officer to die while in command of a submarine.

Life & Career

Loftus Mansergh was born on 2 March, 1873. On his service record, his guardian is listed as Mrs. W. Mansergh of The Cottage, Cranford, Hounslow.[1] Mansergh entered the Royal Navy on 15 July, 1886 when he joined the training ship Britannia.[2]

After passing out of Britannia, Mansergh's first appointment was to the Duke of Wellington on 15 July, 1888.[3] From Duke of Wellington he went to the Monarch on 16 October, 1888, and from there he was appointed to the third-class cruiser Champion on 4 December, 1888.[4] He remained aboard Champion upon his promotion to the rank of Midshipman on 15 January, 1889.[5]

Mansergh was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on 30 June, 1895.[6]

Mansergh was appointed to the coast defence monitor Magdala at Bombay on 1 December, 1896.[7]

Mansergh was appointed additional to the Victory for command of the destroyer Lightning on 10 January, 1899. He remained in command of Lighting almost exactly one year, departing her on 9 January, 1900.[8] Captain Francis Bridgeman described him as "good physical qualities" and recommended him for advancement. Admiral Culme-Seymour wrote he "commanded [Lightning] satisfactorily."[9]

Mansergh was appointed to the Howe on 15 March, 1900.[10] He left Howe to take over duties as First Lieutenant and Gunnery Officer of the third class protected cruiser Psyche on 10 March, 1901. He remained aboard until Psyche paid off on 5 September, 1902. After an inspection, Vice-Admiral Frederick Beford reported in October 1901 that Psyche was "efficient & clean" and had "a fine ship's company, especially the stokers." More praise followed the next month when Commander Edmund Cooper-Key officially recommended Mansergh for gunnery duties.[11]

Mansergh was appointed additional to the Hazard for submarine work in September, 1902. After instruction he was appointed additional to the Latona for command of a submarine on 17 January, 1903. He was transferred to the Thames for the same duties on 20 July, 1903.[12][13] Nine months later, on 18 March, 1904, he was killed while in command of the submarine A 1 when she was run down by the liner Berwick Castle.[14] He and Sub-Lieutenant John Churchill were the first Royal Navy officers to be killed on active duty aboard a submarine.

See Also

Bibliography

  • Lambert, Nicholas (2001). The Submarine Service, 1900-1918. Aldershot: Ashgate for Navy Records Society (2001).
  • Sueter, Commodore Murray F. (1907). The Evolution of The Submarine Boat Mine and Torpedo from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Time. Portsmouth: Gieve's.

Service Records

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
Cecil G. Treherne
Captain of H.M.S. Lightning
10 Jan, 1899[15] – 9 Jan, 1900[16]
Succeeded by
Lawrence L. Dundas
Preceded by
William D. Church
Captain of H.M.S. Ranger
10 Jan, 1899[17]
Succeeded by
Reginald A. Norton
Preceded by
?
Captain of H.M.S. A 1
20 Jul, 1903[Inference] – 18 Mar, 1904[18]
Succeeded by
Philip E. U. Townshend

Footnotes

  1. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/339
  2. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  3. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  4. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  5. The Navy List. (April, 1891). pp. 100, 210.
  6. The Navy List. (April, 1897). p. 93.
  7. The Navy List. (April, 1897). p. 237.
  8. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/339
  9. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  10. The Navy List. (March, 1900). p. 259.
  11. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  12. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/339
  13. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  14. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  15. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107
  16. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/339
  17. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Saturday, Jan 07, 1899; pg. 10; Issue 35720.
  18. Mansergh Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/141/107