H.M.S. Eagle (1918)

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H.M.S. Eagle (1918)
Pendant Number: 94 (1920)[1]
Builder: Armstrong[2]
Laid down: 20 Feb, 1913[3]
Launched: 8 Jun, 1918[4]
Commissioned: Apr, 1920[5]
Torpedoed: 11 Aug, 1942[6]
Fate: Sunk by U-73

H.M.S. Eagle was an aircraft carrier completed for the Royal Navy in 1920 but laid down as a dreadnought battleship for Chile. She is, or is not, a sister to Canada, depending on your perspective. We treat her as distinct. Though she resembled the modern conception of an aircraft carrier in having a continuous flight deck, her basis upon a battleship design offered her no greater aircraft accommodation than the succeeding purpose-built Hermes, which was half her displacement.

Service

On 13 February, 1918, the First Sea Lord Sir Rosslyn E. Wemyss requested the War Cabinet to approve the purchase of Almirante Cochrane for completion as a "seaplane carrier", noting that the Chilean government was willing to transfer the ship on terms similar to those on which Almirante Latorre had been purchased in 1914. Wemyss also noted that at this stage about 9,000 tons of steel had been built into the Cochrane, and that the conversion could be expedited in nine months.[7]

Eagle was commissioned on the Tyne on 6 April, 1920, by Captain Eric V. F. R. Dugmore.[8]

She was paid off at Devonport on 16 November, 1920.[9]

Eagle re-commissioned at Portsmouth on 26 February, 1924.[10]

Torpedo Control

Planned Torpedo Control Installation[11]

There is a wealth of information on the ship's torpedo arrangements despite the fact that the heavy torpedo battery of 18 tubes was stricken before the ship entered service.

She had a T.C.T. aloft, just abaft the G.C.T. and above the navigating top and a second one aft, over the stern of the ship. In addition, she had a night firing position on the compass platform.[12]

She was to have a 15-foot rangefinder in this T.C.T., protected from blast.[13]

In 1919, it was decided that she should use Torpedo Deflection Sight Mark IIIs rather than Torpedo Deflection Sight Mark IVs.[14]

When the torpedo tubes were removed, it seems likely that all arrangements in the plate above were stricken from the design. It is documented that the ship received none of the Torpedo Deflection Sight Mark IIIs indicated.[15]

Mechanical Aid-to-Spotter

As of 1920, she was likely equipped with four Mechanical Aid-to-Spotter Mark II*s with Elliott's Bearing Transmission. The installations may have been similar to those in the Mark I and Mark II patterns used in capital ships:[Inference]

  • one on each side of the foretop, driven by flexible shafting from a gearbox on the director tower
  • one on each side of the Gun Control Tower employing an electrical F.T.P. system.

Supplies of these devices began in June 1918.[16]

Captains

Dates of appointment are provided when known.

See Also

Footnotes

  1. Dittmar; Colledge. British Warships 1914–1919. p. 53.
  2. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. p. 70.
  3. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. p. 70.
  4. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. p. 70.
  5. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. p. 70.
  6. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. p. 70.
  7. The National Archives. G.T. 3607. p. 26.
  8. The Navy List. (December, 1920). p. 765.
  9. The Navy List. (January, 1921). p. 765.
  10. The Navy List. (April, 1925). pp. 235, 236.
  11. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1918. Plate 133.
  12. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1918. p. 211.
  13. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1918. p. 176.
  14. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1919. p. 111.
  15. Annual Report of the Torpedo School, 1920. p. 77.
  16. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 3, Part 23. pp. 25-6.
  17. Dugmore Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/90/92. f. 92.
  18. The Navy List. (January, 1923). p. 753.
  19. Dugmore Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/90/92. f. 92.
  20. The Navy List. (January, 1923). p. 753.
  21. Preston Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/79. f. 79.
  22. The Navy List. (July, 1924). p. 236.
  23. Preston Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/79. f. 79.
  24. Kerr Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/225. f. 225.
  25. Kerr Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/225. f. 225.
  26. Money Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/45. f. 215.
  27. Money Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/45. f. 215.
  28. Laurence Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/48/175. f. 579.
  29. Laurence Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/48/175. f. 579.
  30. Mackie, Colin. ROYAL NAVY WARSHIPS.
  31. Mackie, Colin. ROYAL NAVY WARSHIPS.
  32. Robson Service Records. The National Archives. ADM 196/52/55. f. 411.
  33. Robson Service Records. The National Archives. ADM 196/52/55. f. 411.
  34. Wells Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/181., f. 97.
  35. Wells Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/181., f. 97.
  36. Mackie, Colin. ROYAL NAVY WARSHIPS.
  37. Mackie, Colin. ROYAL NAVY WARSHIPS.
  38. Mackie, Colin. ROYAL NAVY WARSHIPS.

Bibliography

British Aviation Ships
Experimental Cruiser Platform, 1913
Hermes
Seaplane Carriers from Converted Steamers
Ark Royal Empress Riviera Engadine Campania Pegasus
Ben-my-Chree Vindex Manxman Nairana Vindictive
Seaplane Carriers from Seized German Steamers
Anne Raven II
Flat Decked Conversions
Argus Furious
Through-Deck Carriers
Eagle Hermes
Kite Balloon Ships
Canning City of Oxford Hector Manica Menelaus