Edward Altham

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Captain Edward Altham, C.B., R.N., (7 January, 1882 – 16 October, 1950) was an officer in the Royal Navy.

Life & Career

Born in London, Altham entered Britannia on 15 January, 1896. He passed out of Britannia in December, 1897 ranked seventeenth of sixty-four cadets in the examination (the rest of whom seem to have been from the July, 1896 term), with 1635 marks.[1]

Altham was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on 15 July, 1902.[2]

In 1904 he was thanked for a useful report on the defences of Lisbon. In late 1905, he was found to have committed an error in judgment which led to the injury of an able-bodied seaman in the armoured cruiser Hampshire. In December, he prepared reports on the defences of Cherbourg, for which he was also thanked.[3]

Altham suffered a compound fracture of his right ulna on 12 March, 1912 in a coaling accident. He was admitted to Haslar with eight weeks allotted for recovery. In 1912 and 1913, he was involved in evaluation and testing of the new director firing gear in Neptune and Thunderer.[4]

Altham was promoted to the rank of Commander on 30 June, 1913.[5]

He assisted in a study to explore how aeroplanes could be used to assist in spotting naval gunnery.[6]

Altham was in command of the monitor General Craufurd in August, 1915, having been appointed on 20 June. Through November, he was bombarding the Belgian coast.

At the end of April 1918, he left General Craufurd for command of Attentive, in the acting rank of Captain.

In 1918, he was involved in the operations at Zeebrugge and Ostend.

Altham was promoted to the rank of Captain on 31 December, 1918.[7]

Altham became heavily involved in the post-war Northern Russian exertions, directing the naval part of the river expedition. From June, 1919, he was commanding the up river forces out of Borodino. He left command of H.M.S. Fox upon the closure of the naval base at Arkhangel on 27 September, 1919. She would soon depart for home under another's command, towing M.31 some of the time while making the passage.

World War II

Altham worked in postal and telegraph censorship from 1939 to 1944, having been selected to be Chief Radio Censor in time of war. He died in 1950 of lung and prostate cancer.

See Also

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
Arthur T. Taylor
Captain of H.M. T.B. 41
8 Aug, 1902[8]
Succeeded by
Frederick L. Coplestone
Preceded by
Andrew L. Strange
Assistant to the Director of Naval Ordnance
1 Nov, 1913[9] – 20 Oct, 1914[10]
Succeeded by
Alldin U. Moore
Preceded by
New Command
Captain of H.M.S. General Craufurd
20 Jun, 1915[11] – 29 Apr, 1918
Succeeded by
Ralph S. Wykes-Sneyd
Preceded by
Neston W. Diggle
Captain of H.M.S. Attentive
29 Apr, 1918 – 18 Nov, 1918
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
James Burns
Captain of H.M.S. Fox
1 Apr, 1919[12] – 27 Sep, 1919
Succeeded by
?

Footnotes

  1. "Naval & Military Intelligence" The Times (London, England), Thursday, Dec 16, 1897; pg. 7; Issue 35388.
  2. The Navy List. (March, 1913). p. 2.
  3. Altham Service Record The National Archives. ADM 196/47/17. f. 222.
  4. Altham Service Record The National Archives. ADM 196/47/17. f. 222.
  5. The Navy List. (December, 1918). p. 341.
  6. Altham Service Record The National Archives. ADM 196/47/17. f. 222.
  7. The Navy List. (July, 1920). p. 335a.
  8. Altham Service Record The National Archives. ADM 196/47/17. f. 222.
  9. Altham Service Record The National Archives. ADM 196/47/17. f. 222.
  10. Altham Service Record The National Archives. ADM 196/47/17. f. 222.
  11. The Navy List. (November, 1917). p. 393z.
  12. The Navy List. (October, 1919). p. 796.