British Shell in the Great War

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Pre-War

As early as 1907 the Assistant Director of Naval Ordnance, Frederick C. T. Tudor, wrote to the First Lord of the Admiralty, Lord Tweedmouth, that, "There has been lately a question raised as to slight flaws in [Lyddite] shell extending further than hitherto believed, and a stricter form of examination is under consideration."[1]

Fuzes

"Fuze, Percussion, Base, Large, № 16 D, Mark IV."
Developed by order of the Shell Committee, 1917-1918.
Image: Admiralty Technical History. Volume 3. Part 29.

Footnotes

  1. Tudor to Tweedmouth. Letter of 15 August, 1907. Tweedmouth Papers. National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth. MSS 254/50x.

Bibliography

  • McCallum, Iain (2003). "The Riddle of the Shells, 1914-18: The Approach to War, 1882-1914." Warship 2002-2003. Ed. Antony Preston. London: Conway Maritime Press. pp. 3-25. ISBN 0851779263.
  • McCallum, Iain (2004). "The Riddle of the Shells, 1914-18: Part Two: The Test of Battle, Heligoland to the Dardanelles." Warship 2004. Ed. Antony Preston. London: Conway Maritime Press. pp. 9-20. ISBN 0851779484.
  • McCallum, Iain (2005). "The Riddle of the Shells, 1914-18: Part Three: Disappointment in the North Sea." Warship 2005. Ed. Antony Preston; John Jordan. London: Conway Maritime Press. pp. 9-24. ISBN 1844860035.